Costs for Tilers and Prices for Tiling Work

12.5.2022
  1. Lifespan of tiles, slabs and flagstones
  2. Material costs for tiles, slabs and flagstones
  3. Labour costs for the tiler
  4. Lay the tiles yourself or have them laid?
  5. Compare apples with apples



A new natural stone floor for the garden seating area, tiles as a splashback in the kitchen, fine stone tiles on the bathroom walls or a natural stone wall in the living room will change your home fundamentally. That's why you should talk to a tile layer before you renovate individual rooms or the whole house or flat. On the one hand, he will give you expert advice on the choice, on the other hand, he will professionally lay every floor or wall covering and you will get a rough idea of the future costs right from the start.

Houzy Advice

Good to know

In Switzerland we say plates or Plättli and more and more often tiles, in Germany and Austria the Plättli are called as usual in German tiles or slabs.

Houzy Hint

Tip

If you want to know more about tiles in the garden or natural stone in the kitchen and bathroom, read our articles "The right flooring for balcony, garden patio or terrace" and "Was Sie über Naturstein im Bad und in der Küche wissen sollten".

Lifespan of tiles, slabs and flagstones

Many homeowners replace a wall or floor covering before it reaches the end of its life. Ceramic usually lasts 30 years, natural stone 30 to 40 years and porcelain stoneware 40 years. That is longer than most tiles are modern, fit in with the style of furnishings or please the residents. Large formats are currently in demand because they make smaller rooms look bigger, have fewer joints and are therefore easier to clean.

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Material costs for tiles, slabs and flagstones

The costs depend very much on the material, of course. Three examples:

  • Fine stone costs 30 to 150 Swiss francs per square metre*.
  • Ceramics cost 25 to 200 Swiss francs per square metre*.
  • Natural stone costs 50 to 500 Swiss francs per square metre*.

* These values are only approximate. For a more accurate cost estimate ask our tilers.

Houzy Advice

Good to know

Slab layers round up the floor or wall area because they need more slabs for offcuts and reserves. However, they should not add more than 15 per cent.

Houzy Hint

Tip

Standard formats usually cost less than special shapes and sizes. They are also easier to lay, which reduces costs for the tile layer.

Tiler tools and material
The labour costs depend on many factors. Depending on the material, the panel layer needs special tools.

Labour costs for the tiler

The costs depend on the type of panel, the panel size and the conditions on site. Ultimately, the effort involved determines the costs. Natural stone, for example, is more complicated to lay than ceramic. Depending on the tile, the tile layer also needs different tools and materials, for example special adhesive, grout or compatible silicone sealant. A brief overview of the costs for laying standard formats:

  • Fine stone costs 70 to 100 Swiss francs per square metre*.
  • Ceramic tiles cost 70 to 100 Swiss francs per square metre*.
  • Natural stone costs 90 to 110 Swiss francs per square metre*.
  • Priming costs 8 to 12 Swiss francs per square metre*.
  • Waterproofing costs 40 to 60 Swiss francs per square metre*, waterproofing the bathroom costs more than waterproofing the balcony

* All values are indicative only. Small, large and special formats usually cost more, as the tiler will probably need more time and/or more staff. For a more accurate cost estimate ask our tilers.

Houzy Advice

Good to know

Any tile layer can lay ceramic tiles. A natural stone floor is more difficult. That's why you need an experienced tile layer. The best thing is to look at references.

Houzy Hint

Tip

All craftsmen, including tilers, charge for their travel time. That's why it makes sense to hire a paver from your region who doesn't have to travel far.

Lay the tiles yourself or have them laid?

Laying tiles is more difficult than many people realise. First, all tiles must be thoroughly removed and cracks or unevenness repaired. Then the floor must be cleaned absolutely free of dirt and grease so that the primer adheres. Only then can the tiles be laid with mortar or adhesive and grouted. This requires expertise, patience and a lot of time. Especially if the tiles have to be cut to size because the room has no right angles or the tiles have to be laid around a toilet bowl. Besides, you have to think carefully about where to start so that the joints open up and look nice when there are narrowings or transitions to other rooms. Mistakes can cost more than you save with DIY. An uneven subfloor, the wrong adhesive and/or missing dilatation joints, for example, can lead to damage. That's why it pays to hire a professional tiler.

Houzy Hint

Tip

Do you at least want to prepare the subfloor yourself? Talk to your tile layer first. He may have reservations or refuse the substrate if he has to start work. This leads to conflicts and delays.

Kitchen with natural stone floor
In the kitchen, the tiler lays all the floor tiles and, if desired, tiles as splashbacks behind the worktop.

Compare apples with apples

With just a few details, you can ask three certified tilers from your region for offers. Depending on the project, they will come by, inspect the subfloor, take measurements, advise you on materials, shapes and colours, calculate the material costs and estimate their workload. With every offer, make sure that all services correspond to your request, that the offer is complete and that all labour and material costs, but also travel costs, expenses, hourly rate for additional work and payment terms are included. The cheapest offer is not always the best offer.


 
A garden seating area or walkway in the garden made of granite, marble or quartzite? Easy-care ceramic or fine stone tiles in the bathroom? A terracotta floor for the new Tuscan-style kitchen? Talk to a tiler from the Houzy network about your plans.

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